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Resources

This resource page provides useful information for people needing a PA or for PAs looking for work. If you are aware of any additional resources that you think may benefit others, then please Contact Us and let us know.

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Resources for People Employing a PA

Finding and recruiting a PA for the first time can seem like a daunting task and there is legislation that you'll need to comply with. The following resources will support you through the process and help reduce the concerns you might be facing. Our explanations, examples and downloadable templates should provide you with a good starting point through this process.

  • Job Descriptions and Person Specifications - These documents explain the job particulars such as hours of work, rate of pay, the support you need, the duties that the PA is expected to do and the skills they require.
  • Adverts and Advertising - An advert is a brief description of your vacancy. There are different ways of writing one and you need to consider where best to advertise it to reach the right person
  • Application Forms and CVs - You can create an application form and ask PAs applying to your vacancy to complete it or you can ask them to send you their CV, a document that provides details of their work history, experience and qualifications.
  • Shortlisting and Interviewing - Shortlisting is the process you go through to identify the best people that have applied for your vacancy. You will then invite these selected people to interview where you would meet and ask them questions to find out which one best meets your needs.
  • Employment Suitability Checks - There are checks that you need to do before employing someone. Some of these are a legal requirement and others are optional.
  • Statement of Employment Particulars - Often known as the contract of employment, this is the written details that you are legally required to provide if you employ someone for at least one month or more.
  • Payroll and Employer Contributions - You need to decide on the best way of managing your PA's pay including their Income Tax and National Insurance contributions and any other staff benefits they may be entitled to.
  • Induction and Probation Period - An induction by you will ensure the person you employ is trained in using specialist equipment and fully understands the job role. The probation period is an agreed length of time at the beginning of employment used as a trial period to ensure that both you and the PA are happy with the new working relationship.
  • Insurances - As an employer you are advised to have insurance policies to protect you and your PA.
  • Training - You might want to consider attending some training about being an employer or learn about training that you'll need to provide for anyone you employ.

Resources for a Person Using a Self-Employed PA

Using a PA who is self-employed is an option for you, especially if you're only requiring support for a short period of time or for ad hoc occasions. A self-employed PA will be registered with HMRC and pay their own Income Tax and National Insurance contributions and hold their own insurances. You do not have to pay them sickness or holiday pay but they will demand a higher hourly rate of pay compared to when you employ your own PA direct. Some of the above resources will still apply with respect to advertising through to interviewing, however, the rules change slightly as outlined below:

  • Employment Suitability Checks - There are checks that you should carry out to ensure that the person you employ is suitable and is registered to work as a self-employed person.
  • Contract for Services - You do not need to have a contract of employment but it is sensible to have some agreed conditions to ensure both of you are clear about what is expected.
  • Invoices and Payments - A self-employed person will normally invoice you for any hours they have worked and you would pay them directly. Remember, they would be responsible for paying their own Income Tax and NI contributions.
  • Induction and Probation Period - A good induction by you will ensure that the self-employed person fully understands the job role including undertaking any training on specialist equipment. Although a probation period is not necessary, it is still good practise to have an agreed trial period to ensure that both you and the PA are happy with the new working relationship.
  • Insurances - A self-employed person should have their own Public Liability insurance but you should still have your own policies such as household insurance to protect your belongings in case they are damaged or broken.
  • Training - You should consider attending training to ensure that you're aware of your responsibilities.

Resources for a PA

If you are a PA or considering becoming a PA, the following resources will provide you with information and things you need to consider.

  • Employed or Self-Employed - Understand the differences between being employed as a PA or working as a self-employed PA.
  • Application Forms and CVs - You will respond to adverts with an application form or a CV. Either way it's important to ensure you include the correct information.
  • Suitability to Work Checks - Make sure that you are eligible and have the correct documentation to work in the UK. Dependent on the role you will be undertaking, you may be required to have a DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service) check (formerly CRB check).
  • Statement of Employment Particulars and Contract for Services - Learn more about what formal agreements you should expect or have in place whilst being a PA.
  • Induction and Probation Period - The person that you work for should provide you with an induction to ensure that you fully understand the job role including providing training on specialist equipment. Although a probation period is not necessary, it is still good practise to have an agreed trial period to ensure that both you and the person you're working for are happy with the new working relationship.
  • Insurances - Make sure that appropriate insurance policies are in place before you start work.
  • Training - You may be eligible for free training such as manual handling and food hygiene that you should consider attending. Other training opportunities may also benefit you in your role as a PA.